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The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

Amber Lascelles, Amina Jama and Désirée Reynolds discuss what Black Feminism means to them, its relationship with the Black Lives Matter Movement, and the role of imagination in dismantling systemic racism and misogynoir. They end by reflecting on the way in which literature helps articulate Black womxn’s experiences and dreams.

Amber Lascelles is a PhD researcher at the University of Leeds who writes on Black feminist resistance in contemporary black women’s fiction. Amina Jama is an internationally acclaimed writer, poet and performer who recently published her first collection A Warning To The House That Holds Me. Désirée Reynolds is a writer, teacher and trustee of The Racial Justice Network who published her first novel Seduce in 2013.

This event took place as part of The Lit Collective Sheffield Online Festival (23–25 July 2020) and is available to watch back below.

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