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The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

Sheffield Modern

Ticket prices vary by event

Sheffield Modern is an arts festival inspired by the city's architecture.

Sheffield's experiments in modern architecture have played a significant role in defining not just the skyline but also the character and culture of the city. Looking at the past and present of the city's design and developments, the second Sheffield Modern weekender aims to get people thinking about the shape of the city in new ways – through exhibitions, talks, walks, family-focussed workshops, installations, and film screenings.

This year's programme is themed around two strands:

  • Social Housing at 100 – looking at questions around housing today, one hundred years on from the Housing Act (also known as the Addison Act), which paved the way for large-scale council housing developments.
  • Return to the Workshop – taking its name and inspiration from the teachings of the hugely influential Bauhaus art school, founded in Germany one hundred years ago. The school's manifesto called for artists to bring the spirit of architecture into other art forms, unite disciplines, and "return to the workshop" in order to become "a world that builds".

See the full programme.

Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.

Supported by Site Gallery. Supported by City of Ideas funded through Arts Council England's Ambition For Excellence fund.

With funding and support from: Sheffield Hallam University, RIBA Yorkshire, Sheffield Society of Architects, Sheffield Town Trust, BDP, and David Mellor.

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