This website uses cookies. Read more about our cookie/privacy policy.

Accept and Close

The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

Delicious Clam

Delicious Clam have been creating space both literally and figuratively for many of Sheffield’s DIY bands since 2013. Operating as a label, practice room and small gig space from their Castle Market headquarters, they fuel the fire of Sheffield’s alternative scene. Now they’re exploring new territories, from stand-up to brilliantly daft club nights. They tell us more.

How would you describe Delicious Clam?
Delicious Clam is a labour of love. A self-facilitating media node, bringing together the mediums of performing music, practicing music, recording music, showcasing music, and releasing music as a record label. We try to be as inclusive to as wide a variety of other artistic methods as humanly possible in a small space: art, comedy, dance, DIY, etc. We've got it all.

How did it come into being?
Around 2013 we came across Sheffield stalwarts Temple of Coke's video for the song Pure Shores. We noticed notorious party starter (and some would say one-hit wonder) Andrew WK had left a comment underneath: "THIS PARTIES HARD". We wanted a piece of that, so started up a practice space on the corner of Arundel Street and Sidney Street in the old Cultural Industries Quarter. That space is now a car park, so we moved to a new space on Exchange Street, in which we hope to be able to foster a new era of great, innovative Sheffield music.

Who is involved?
Throughout its existence, Sheffield music scene alumni – members of Best Friends, Nai Harvest, Avida Dollars, Thee Mightees, Radical Boy, Bruce & Carl, The Hipshakes, Thumbuster, Tommy Hillfinger, Fruit Bomb – as well as countless others – friends, helpers and even hinderers who have all contributed to what the Clam has been, what it is, and what it will be in the future.

How important are DIY venues for a city?
We can't speak objectively on this subject, but they have been vital for local bands and artists who without them would have been chewed up and spat out by "the man", paying to play venues, getting short shrift from many a promoter (#notallpromoters). Spaces such as Tye Die Tapes, The Audacious Art Experiment and The Lughole have put Sheffield on the map nationwide. Many people complain that no bands come through Sheffield anymore – they need to look at what they have on their doorstep already, and discover the brilliant venues and community that aren't seen in a lot of cities around the UK.

What do you love about Sheffield?
It's a city with a village feel, half siege mentality, half wanting to shout about itself on the national stage. Living in the past yet with an exciting future. We find that contrast very endearing.

What would you do to improve the city?
Sheffield needs more places where you can say "I've never watched Star Wars" without people saying "WHAT?! You've never watched Star Wars?!" Also, cheese and guac should not be a chargeable extra on burritos under any circumstances. They are a standard ingredient. Please note, Sheffield and its many burrito establishments.

Don't miss the Clamlines weekender in July. Delicious Clam features in a short film we made with Sheffield Hallam Uni, alongside a bunch of other fine Sheffield music establishments – watch below.

You might also like...

Wesley Gonzalez

Tue. 23 November 2021

Delicious Clam

The former front man of cult-indie icons Let’s Wrestle. He’s swapped his band's lo-fi, guitar driven for a style influenced by pop and soul from the 70s and 80s – somewhere between Sly and the Family Stone, Pulp, Giorgio Moroder and George Michael.

Hagglers Corner

Indian-inspired cafe by day, lively music venue by night. Hagglers' bunting-strewn courtyard is also lined with an array of indie businesses, from a yoga studio to a florist to a music school.

DINA presents The Oozes + DUCK + Gum Disease

Thu. 18 November 2021

DINA

Join DINA for a night of energetic queer punk.

UDAGAN

UDAGAN combine the contemporary technology of live coding with indigenous folklore and shamanic culture from the Arctic North, resulting in otherworldly soundscapes. We spoke to Saydyy-Kuo and Oscar ahead of the duo's performance at Sensoria.